Archive for July, 2014

Points of View

At Fairhaven School, one must always remain open to seeing things from new and different perspectives. It is with this spirit in mind that I share these bird’s eye views of our remarkable campus. I hope that you are enjoying your summer, and we all look forward to another school year spent discovering both new and familiar things from multiple points of view.

 

Richard Morris

Staff Member and Alumnus

Fairhaven Drone 1Fairhaven Drone 2Fairhaven Drone 3Fairhaven Drone 4Fairhaven Drone 5

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Points of View

At Fairhaven School, one must always remain open to seeing things from new and different perspectives. It is with this spirit in mind that I share these bird’s eye views of our remarkable campus. I hope that you are enjoying your summer, and we all look forward to another school year spent discovering both new and familiar things from multiple points of view.

 

Richard Morris

Staff Member and Alumnus

Fairhaven Drone 1Fairhaven Drone 2Fairhaven Drone 3Fairhaven Drone 4Fairhaven Drone 5

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Get to Know Alpine Valley School

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You’ve heard of us—now get to know us a little better! On Saturday, September 13 at 10am, come enjoy our campus and meet Alpine Valley School parents, alumni, and staff. This special event will feature self-guided tours and a short presentation (followed by Q&A), as well as opportunities to chat informally with members of the AVS Community on topics important to you. We’ll have a slide show of scenes from daily school life, plus materials about the Sudbury Model of education that you can take with you. Refreshments and childcare will be provided.

Register for this event here!

 

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Winging It

[Today's blog post comes from Alpine Valley School student Alexander Alford]

Late in May, as the school year was ending, I found an article titled “Everyone is totally just winging it, all the time”. That is to say, even though most everyone likes to pretend that they know what they’re doing, they often don’t—not on a deep level. If you’re skilled in the art of improvisation and acting like you know exactly enough, you are seen as competent. If you aren’t so skilled, or downright bad at those things, then you’re seen as average, or incompetent. There are other forces at play, of course, but being able to improvise solutions without perfect information or planning is essential. Put simply, winging your way through life is the norm, and a deciding factor in one’s success in a wide range of situations.

If you believe there are mythical competent people in charge, think about every professional position you’ve held throughout your life. Was anyone around you magically competent? Probably not. Everyone thinks someone else knows something they themselves do not, and oddly enough, the supposed knowledge-bearers don’t know either. Most people have something they’ve learned to do, and they stick to it. But there are a few people who are ready and willing (or even eager) to venture outside their immediate area of knowledge. These are the people who are comfortable with improvising. These are the people who are considered competent, and thus valued highly.

Saying that conventional schooling doesn’t instill any improvisational ability in its students would be incorrect. It would be accurate, however, to say that educational models like Sudbury schooling instill much more ability to ‘wing it’ effectively through life. Imagine a ‘normal’ student of conventional schooling. They go through a curriculum that presents rigid deadlines at every turn, with deviation discouraged by both their authority figures and (albeit to a lesser extent) their peers. Now imagine a Sudbury student: deciding what they want to do for themselves at every turn, rather than being pushed to the ‘correct’ way. Learning how to navigate and improvise for themselves for the majority of their childhood, rather than being constantly guided by an outside process until they’re ‘old enough.’

Which group do you think will be more likely to excel at improvising their way through the complications and challenges of the world?

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What Do Grown Unschoolers Think of Unschooling? IV in Series

Most of the grown unschoolers in our survey were very happy with their unschooling and said they would unschool their own children. A few, however, were unhappy, and their descriptions of their childhoods make it clear why they would be. This final report in the series describes the advantages and disadvantages of unschooling, in the respondents’ own words.

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What Do Grown Unschoolers Think of Unschooling? IV in Series

Most of the grown unschoolers in our survey were very happy with their unschooling and said they would unschool their own children. A few, however, were unhappy, and their descriptions of their childhoods make it clear why they would be. This final report in the series describes the advantages and disadvantages of unschooling, in the respondents’ own words.

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What Do Grown Unschoolers Think of Unschooling? IV in Series

Most of the grown unschoolers in our survey were very happy with their unschooling and said they would unschool their own children. A few, however, were unhappy, and their descriptions of their childhoods make it clear why they would be. This final report in the series describes the advantages and disadvantages of unschooling, in the respondents’ own words.

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What Do Grown Unschoolers Think of Unschooling? IV in Series

Most of the grown unschoolers in our survey were very happy with their unschooling and said they would unschool their own children. A few, however, were unhappy, and their descriptions of their childhoods make it clear why they would be. This final report in the series describes the advantages and disadvantages of unschooling, in the respondents’ own words.

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What Do Grown Unschoolers Think of Unschooling? IV in Series

Most of the grown unschoolers in our survey were very happy with their unschooling and said they would unschool their own children. A few, however, were unhappy, and their descriptions of their childhoods make it clear why they would be. This final report in the series describes the advantages and disadvantages of unschooling, in the respondents’ own words.

Comments off

What Do Grown Unschoolers Think of Unschooling? IV in Series

Most of the grown unschoolers in our survey were very happy with their unschooling and said they would unschool their own children. A few, however, were unhappy, and their descriptions of their childhoods make it clear why they would be. This final report in the series describes the advantages and disadvantages of unschooling, in the respondents’ own words.

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